Tuesday, September 8, 2020

Social Security System (SSS) Scams That You Should Avoid To Protect Your Online Account

Have you experienced reading an online post informing you that you won a raffle promo or you were entitled to a cash bonus?

Then, it will advise you to click a link, which will request you to key in your SSS personal data.

 

Or have you been approached by someone who offers SSS-related services, such as getting an SSS number in exchange for a fee?

 

If your answer is YES, then, you must have been scammed.

 

Related Post: 3 Bank Scams That are Common During the Lockdown

                            I was Scammed: My Bank Credit Card Story

                            5 Useful Tips That Will Foil Any Bank Scam Attemps


                            


How does SSS scam work?

 

An individual, pretending to be SSS employees will reach out to you, to request sensitive information such as your email address or mobile phone number to allegedly update your SSS records.

 

Once, your personal information are with the scammers, they can change your password and apply for a loan in your name. 

 

What is the nature of SSS scams?

 

There is only one common denominator of an SSS scam: scammers will collect your personal information through email or social media, via a call or SMS.

 

There were also reported cases of “fixers” helping unsuspecting members and getting duped into divulving their sensitive information.

 

How to avoid scammers?

 

The SSS official FB Page, SSSPH warns members to be vigilant and to just keep their personal information to themselves only.



  1. Don’t open clickbait posts about a raffle or cash bonus for SSS members. This link will lure you to give your data;
  2. Ignore calls from fake SSS employees who will ask you for sensitive information such as your mobile number or email password;
  3. Do not accept any offers from someone willing to help you with your SSS transactions.

What are the SSS official channels?

 

All SSS online services are free and can only be done in My.SSS or SSS Mobile App and in all SSS offices nationwide.

 

For other concerns, you may contact any of the SSS contact details below:

 

Facebook: SSSPH

Twitter: PHLSSS

Youtube: MySSSPhilippines

Hotline: 1455 or 1-800-10-2255-77 (toll-free)

Email: 

General inquiries: member_relations@sss.gov.ph

For electronic facilities and web-related inquiries - onlineserviceassistance@sss.gov.ph

PRB Generation and Technical Support: PRNHelpline@sss.gov.ph

Contact Service Unit: ofw.relations@sss.gov.ph

Final Thoughts

No one is a scammer unless you allowed yourself to be scammed.

Knowing the tell-tale signs of scamming will prevent you from losing your hard-earned savings.

Let us always be on guard when it comes to our finances. Nowadays, fraudsters are more sophisticated in carrying out their evil intentions.



12 comments:

  1. Yikes, I didn't know about some of this. Thanks for working to keep us safe!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I get such mails all the time, ones telling you you won a raffle or inherited some funds and others. I don't click them because I don't play raffles or expecting any inheritance. Thanks a lot for the info on what happens when such links are clicked.

    ReplyDelete
  3. It's scary how there are so many scammers online, ready to take advantage of unsuspecting people. These are great tips to stay safe while on the internet!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Oh my it would be so scary to get your information stolen. Its so important to protect your data!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I haven't gotten any of those emails, fortunately. And I don't think I would fall for them. But what does worry me is that some scammers are very sneaky and crafty and I fear that they will come up with something that sounds credible. I hate how careful we have to be because of these people.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have being receiving those types of emails.
    I have also being getting emails from some weird "insurance company" called auto and reward, telling me to redeem my money.
    I don't know how to stop getting these emails.

    ReplyDelete
  7. SSS is already a pain to deal with back in the day... Glad I've come to read your post about SSS scams to avoid this.

    ReplyDelete
  8. So many social security scams out. Thank you for the warning.

    ReplyDelete
  9. My husband is always on the look out for scams and check the mail and email for this all the time, especially for my daughter

    ReplyDelete
  10. I did not know anything about it, thanks for this vast and detailed update.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Ugh! I hate these freaking scammers. Sometimes they sound so real too, it's easy to see how people can get suckered. These are all great tips to help avoid that!

    ReplyDelete
  12. It's always a good thing when bloggers share information like this. It helps to educate people.

    ReplyDelete

Hey there! I would like to hear your thoughts. Please comment below.